All Posts tagged acupuncture

What is Contemporary Medical Acupuncture?

By Dr. Elisa Petricca
 

Contemporary Medical Acupuncture is a nerve stimulation technique, which involves the painless insertion of extra fine needles into specific areas of the body in order to regulate abnormal activity of the nervous system and to release certain substances in the brain, altering the body’s pain pathways.

Medical Acupuncture is a very low risk treatment intervention. However, as with any conservative approach to care, potential side effects and/or risks should be discussed with the patient prior to treatment.

How Does Medical Acupuncture Work?

  • Normalizes the nervous system and alters pain sensation via stimulation of the central nervous system.
  • Improves blood flow to local areas of pain as well as the rest of the body resulting in tissue repair and facilitation of the healing process.
  • Reduce tension in the body by helping with the breakdown of excess fascia and tissue.
  • Helps to calm the body and mind, assisting in overall well-being.

Acupuncture Treatments  

The duration of acupuncture treatments can vary from several seconds to 30 minutes. Acupuncture treatments involve the insertion of acupuncture needles into appropriate areas of the body. Once the needles are inserted and secure in the body, they may be stimulated manually or with electricity to enhance nerve stimulation.

Acupuncture has been shown as an effective treatment for many conditions. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes the use of acupuncture in the treatment of neurological and muscular disorders including:

  • Headaches
  • Neck and back pain
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Sports injuries (sprains, strains)
  • Sciatica
  • Neuritis (inflammation of nerves)
  • Facial pain
For more information or if you have any questions, feel free to contact the office and we will be happy to help you!

References:
1. Canadian Contemporary Acupuncture Association, 2010-2016.
2. McMaster University Medical Contemporary Acupuncture Program, 2016.
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Mending the Body with Moxa

There are a lot of funky words that Western communities have had to acquaint themselves with when it comes to alternative medicine and health: yoga, reiki, pilates, Ayurveda, feng shui. Here’s a word you might not be quite so familiar with: moxa. Associated with acupuncture, the buzz word is short for Moxibustion, a traditional Chinese practice that targets a range of ailments including digestive disorders, arthritic pain, and asthma.

The Chinese believed that the application of heat and even burning to targeted parts of the body can increase circulation and encourage restorative properties. In fact, some traditional moxa treatments actually entailed burning and blistering the skin at targeted points on the body. Don’t worry though- today, Western versions of the treatment will typically only involve warming the areas of the body to be treated. Instead of directly applying a flame or lit paper to the skin, modern moxa keeps heat close to the body without contact.

Moxa 101

Here’s how a moxa treatment session will typically go: rolled leaves of plants like mugwort, ginger and mulberry are crushed and either wrapped in paper like a cigarette, or densely packed to resemble a cigar. At Thrive Health, Dr. Heins uses the latter, avoiding potential for burning paper accidents. The “cigarette” is lit at one end and depending on the practitioner, the stick is either held above the body or carefully placed on the skin. Sometimes the moxa stick is rotated or tapped against the skin as well. At Thrive, our moxa treatments never touch the skin, but have the same intended soothing effect. Patients find moxa to be deeply relaxing.

Moxa is believed to soothe and improve a variety of ailments and health conditions. The healing powers of moxa are derived from its perceived ability to provide the body with the necessary balancing “yang” energy. This energy is believed to direct the body’s movement and temperature. Moxa can also be useful in treating a pregnant woman whose baby is presenting breech, and for helping to ease post-birth pelvic and lower back pain.

Heating Needle Moxa

In this alternative form of moxibustion therapy, dried mugwort is rolled and placed on the head of the acupuncture needle. The practitioner then lights the roll which burns slowly in an upright position while the needle stays inserted in the target point. The heat from the burning mugwort travels through the needle and deep into the muscles. This is effective for arthritic muscle and joint pain.

As with many alternative and Eastern therapies that have been adopted by different trained Western health professionals, treatments and procedures will vary slightly from practitioner to practitioner. The patient’s condition is the primary factor in determining which form of moxa will be most effective, so your practitioner will have to assess the best course of action for your individual case.

Moxa can be a wonderful way to soothe and restore a targeted area or muscle by returning an equilibrium in energies to the body. If you want to avoid synthetic, over-the-counter medications for pain relief, moxa is definitely worth a try.

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