All Posts tagged wellness

Welcome Back Fall!

As the temperatures begin to cool and our schedules begin to look hectic, we can all succumb to that first seasonal cold.  Cold and Flu season may not be here yet, but we know that it is on its way!

We at Thrive wanted to give your immune system a little boost by giving you some ideas on what you can incorporate into your diet that might help you fight off those nasty germs.

Immune Boosting Foods:

Garlic
Add some garlic to your dishes and not only enhance the flavours of your foods, but also allow your white-blood cells (aka. The Cold Fighters), to flourish and increases the efficiency of antibody production.  This means your body is able to fight off any virus more easily, and makes the long cold and flu season a bit shorter.  Have trouble digesting garlic?  Try taking out the green root in the centre of each clove to make those garlic burps a bit less potent.
Citrus
Lemons, limes, grapefruit, oranges- you name it- if it’s a citrus, it has Vitamin C.  Increasing your Vitamin C intake naturally increases your immune efficiency, which is exactly what we need for this time of year.  If you need an easy way to add a bit more Vitamin C into your diet, as well as help increase your water intake, try adding lemon to your morning glass of water.  Not only do you instantly have flavoured water, you start off your day right with a bit of Vitamin C!
Turmeric
Have you been noticing this spice everywhere these days?  Us too!  But for good reason- turmeric is a natural anti-inflammatory and more recent studies show that it also might be good for reducing fever.  So drink up those Turmeric lattes and eat up some Indian curries and you may be helping your health!
 Bell Peppers
These beauties have twice the amount of Vitamin C as citrus, and the added bonus of beta-carotene which is great for healthy skin.  Add some to your stir fry or simply eat as a snack with hummus (perhaps garlic hummus?) and your body will thank you!
Ginger
Ginger works in the same way as Vitamin C and can help you avoid a cold.  It can also help if you are just starting a cold by relieving your sore throat. Feel a tingle in your throat?  Boil some ginger and lemon to make a natural tea that soothes the throat and boosts your immune system.  Add a bit of honey and you have a sure fire way of fighting those cold systems.
For an easy way to combine some of these great immune-boosting ingredients (and some not mentioned here), check out this Turmeric Pineapple Kiwi and Kale recipe:


Ingredients:
2 cups frozen pineapple
¾ cups unsweetened almond milk
½ tsp turmeric
2 kiwis
1 banana
2 cups Kale

Blend all ingredients and enjoy!

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2018 Consumer Choice Award!

Thrive is thrilled to announce that it has been selected as the 2018 Consumer Choice Award winner in the category of Naturopathic Medicine in the Toronto Central Region!

It has always been Dr. Kristin Heins’ mission to provide individualized and holistic care where her patients receive truly specialized treatments that support both their mental and physical well-being. Dr. Heins is extremely grateful to be recognized for her work and will continue to provide current and future patients with optimal care to help them feel their absolute best.

Thank you from the entire team here at Thrive for this incredible honour!

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Cleaning up our Intake through the Indulgent Summer

Summertime carries with it an energy of excitement, enjoyment and freedom. The days are longer, the weather inviting. For many, we translate this energy into a lifestyle that includes more barbeques, social events, alcohol and often less nutritious food choices. With so few months to enjoy social time comfortably outside with friends, I think switching our mindset from “avoidance” to “improved” is a great way to approach food and alcohol consumption this summer. Many patients come in and ask how to make reasonable improvements to their summer routines and so decided to share a few tips and suggestions in this month’s newsletter:
•    Loading up on creamy side dishes and red meat barbeque is not great for heart health or our waistline. Opt instead to grill vegetables on the bbq and experiment with salmon and fish recipes that cook in a flash and are part of the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet.
•    Alcohol intake is typically a calorie exploder in the summer. Try and clean up your drinking, to the extent this can be true, by using clear alcohol (vodka, gin, tequila) and mixing with low sugar and low sodium options like soda stream water with lemon and lime slices or low sodium San Pellegrino. Remember also that most beer and many vodkas are wheat-based …. so if this is a food group you try and avoid in food form it is typically best avoided as an alcohol also.
•    Most of us are more social in the summer. Try making socializing and connecting with family and friends the “treat” and not use social events as a reason to have two plates of dessert.
•    Bring nutritious and seasonal fruits and vegetables to parties or have them out at your own! Opting to pick at these as snacks between meals is a great way to fill the urge while also being good to your body.

A Word on Blood Services and Our Community:

Many of us know that donating blood can save lives. Medical advancements make it so that today, a number of blood related diseases like leukemia, aplastic anemia, certain metabolic disorders and inherited immune system diseases can also be treated with donated stem cells.
In September, Thrive has decided to have information available at the clinic for patients looking to learn more about donating blood services. We want to offer patients more detailed information on steps and facts about blood donation and registering to be stem cell donor. Keep your eyes and ears open and don’t forget to pick up your fact sheet when in the clinic.
If you want more information today, start by checking out www.blood.ca

By: Dr. Kristin Heins ND, RP (qualifying)

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Allergies – Why They Happen and How You Can Help Stop Them

I wanted to share an article on allergies as many this time of year suffer seasonal allergy symptoms. At a fun time of year to enjoy the outdoors, no one wants to be overwhelmed with congestion and low energy!!
Allergies occur when the body mounts an immune system response to substances inhaled or ingested from the environment. For allergy sufferers, these substances (called allergens) enter the body and then the body sends out an immune particle (called an immunoglobulin)  to  attack the foreign substance! An inflammatory cascade is then set in motion. For allergy sufferers, the rest is known and seen through their symptoms!

Common Allergy Symptoms:
Runny nose, runny and / or itchy eyes, sinus inflammation and headaches, generalized fatigue, shortness of breath, asthma.  Skin conditions can include rashes or darkening around the eyes “allergic shiner” is also common. For some ingested allergens we can have anaphylaxis or severe swelling in the throat, hives and for less severe sensitivities you may have indigestion, gas, cramping or bowel changes (not considered an allergy but still a cause of immune response).
What we also now know is that allergen / immune complex binding can have mood and brain involvement causing symptoms like agitation, irritability and / or depression.
Allergy Triad: allergies, asthma, eczema – all signs of a hyper responsiveness of the immune system.

Tip #1: Eat Plenty of foods rich in antioxidants as well as minerals essential to the immune system.

  • Oxidation increases as our body fights off germs. Help offset this reaction with antioxidant foods.
  • Foods containing beta- carotene, including dark green, yellow, and orange vegetables. Eat at least two servings of one or more of these vegetables daily.
  • Vegetables and fruits that contain vitamin C, such as broccoli, green/red peppers, cabbage, collard greens, and citrus fruits. Eat at least one-2 servings daily. Vitamin C is especially important for those with allergies as vitamin C plays a major role in modulating the histamine response which plays a major role in allergic congestion and skin irritation.
  • Foods containing vitamin E, especially seeds and nuts, brown rice, sweet potatoes, and beans.
Tip #2: Reduce Allergen exposure by using a salt water (saline) nasal rinse daily during allergy season.
Tip #3: See a specialist to devise an individualized plan to optimize your immune functionality and support organs of elimination (liver, bowel, lymph, kidneys) that may be under functioning. Dr. Heins or a licensed Naturopathic Doctor can customize a supplement approach based on your specific symptoms and allergy (immune) presentation.
Written by: Dr. Kristin Heins, ND
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We now offer osteopathy!

Just a reminder that Thrive now has an osteopath, Marine Burkhardt!

Marine received her DOMP (Diploma of Osteopathy Manual Practitioner) from the Osteopathic College of Provence (COP) in France in 2017 after a 5 year training period.

She has a holistic approach to Osteopathy and adapts her treatment according to the patients unique needs. She practices visceral, cranio-sacral therapy and various joint techniques.

She has a special interest in care for children, newborns and pregnant women. Her graduation thesis studied postnatal treatment of mothers with breastfeeding issues. In her studies, she practiced cranial techniques with the goal of impacting lactation hormones to stimulate and regulate milk production. Very promising results were visible during these studies, which encouraged her to further pursue investigation of these techniques.

The range of her techniques is beneficial to all kind of patients.  As an osteopath, she treats athletes who train and need maintenance care on a regular basis or are recovering from injuries.  Her techniques are also very helpful in stress-management and various physical conditions, including chronic headaches.

She will welcome you in French and in English.

Her hours are as follows:

Tuesdays 8:30am-2pm
Wednesdays 8:30am-12pm, 3:30pm-7pm
Fridays 8:30am-5pm

You can book your initial appointment online or call the office at 647-352-7911.

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Staying Pain Free During Summer Activity

By Dr. Kristin Heins
 
Summer weather allows us all to  spend more time outdoors. We are encouraged to increase outdoor activity and many of us prefer to take in some time outdoors while being active anyway. With increased walking, running, hiking or swimming you may end up with new injuries or even aggravating old injuries or conditions.

It is always best to see a licensed health care practitioner to attend to your case specifics and format an individualized plan; but, below are some quick tips to help you make the most of the increased activity potential that summer affords while reducing the chance of injury or body strain.

  1. Know your limits: gradually increase endurance activities and take rest days after increased exertion.
  2. Stretch: Be sure to follow a stretching routine that addresses targeted areas to help prevent strain injuries.
  3. Attend to your symptoms: If your body is sending you messages it is hurt – listen. See your doctor, naturopath, physiotherapist or chiropractor to have an assessment to see what needs to be done to best heal and resolve the issue.
  4. Stay hydrated: Lactic acid builds in muscles after exertion and causes stiffness and soreness. It requires proper hydration to be best eliminated so make sure to drink before and after activity.
  5. Supplementation: If you have inflammatory conditions it may be useful to get on a supplementation regime to assist in optimizing you management of it. This way you can stay as active as possible in a non detrimental way.
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Practice Safe Gardening

Dr. Jennifer Wise, D.C.

300_family_garden

I know it’s been a long time since we’ve thought about many outdoor activities, but the exciting truth is that it’s finally almost time for those “May flowers”!  If you’re planning on gardening, keep these tips in mind to avoid injury:

1. Warm-up

Try going on a short walk to loosen up your muscles and get your blood circulating before beginning gardening.

2. Stretch before and after your gardening session.

The Ontario Chiropractic Association recommends starting with these stretches to avoid injury.  Hold all stretches for 15 to 20 seconds. Stop if it is painful.

  • Thigh Stretch: With one hand on the wall or a tree, bend your left knee then reach back and hold your ankle with your right hand. Pull your heel toward your buttocks and hold for 30 seconds. Relax and repeat with the other leg. To stretch the back thigh muscles (hamstrings), with one hand on the wall or a tree put one foot on a chair, stump, or step. Slowly bend forward from the waist until you feel the pull at the back of your thigh. Hold for 30 seconds. Relax and repeat with the other leg.
  • Back Stretch: Sit on a chair and slowly bend your body forward from your hips, putting your head down and resting your hands on the floor.  Hold, then relax.
  • Shoulder Rolls:
    With your arms hanging loosely at your sides, slowly rotate your shoulders in a circular motion forward, then backward.
  • Wrist Extension: Hold one arm straight out as if you were giving a ‘stop’ signal, use your opposite hand to hold this position. Hold. Repeat with the other hand.
  • Wrist Flexion: Hold one arm out in front, palm down. Bend your fingers until they point toward the ground. Use your opposite hand to hold this position.

3. Lift with Care.

For any heavy lifting always try to recruit some help.  If you must lift alone, please remember these basic rules:

  1. Stand close to the load to be lifted
  2. Place your feet shoulder-width apart
  3. Keep your back straight
  4. Squat down to the object’s level and test the weight of the load
  5. Use the strength of your leg and arm muscles to smoothly and slowly lift the load
  6. Keep the load close to your body
  7. Pivot to turn and face the intended direction of travel. Proceed with the load
  8. Avoid twisting your body while carrying the load
  9. Bend your knees and slowly lower the load to its intended place

Remember to have your spine checked by your chiropractor- you may not always feel a subluxation, but if you are starting with a spine that is misaligned or not moving properly, you will be much more likely to experience an injury.  Come in and see Dr. Wise for a Spring tune-up

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How to Manage High Stress Periods…Like the Holidays!!

By Dr. Kristin Heins

I came across an article on the Mayo Clinic website (www.mayoclinic.org) on stress management around the holidays and really liked it. It may be especially helpful during the hectic and emotion-filled holiday season; but, is also a useful life approach to stress management. Most of us know that stress and feeling overwhelmed does not limit itself to holidays!! When stress is at it’s peak, it’s hard to stop and regroup. The feeling is often one of overwhelm vs. support. Below are ten ways to try and shift the balance back to a more supportive experience:

headache1. Acknowledge your feelings: If historical or present day loss and sadness exist, accept that it’s normal to feel sadness and grief. It’s OK to take time to cry or express your feelings.

2. Reach out: If you feel lonely or isolated – seek out community, faith-based or other social events as they can offer support and companionship. Volunteering may also lift your spirits and broaden friendships.

3. Be realistic: The holidays may not (likely won’t) be perfect or just like last year. As families change and grow, traditions and rituals often change as well. Choose a few to hold on to, and be open to creating new ones. For example, if adult-children can’t come to your house, find new ways to celebrate together, such as sharing pictures, emails, videos, skyping.

4. Set aside differences: Set aside familial grievances during gatherings until a more appropriate time for discussion. Try and find understanding if others get upset or distressed when something goes awry – chances are they’re feeling the effects of holiday stress just like you may be.

5. Stick to a budget: Before you shop, decide how much money you can afford to spend. Then stick to your budget. Ways to manage budgets:

  • Donate to a charity in someone’s name.
  • Give homemade gifts.
  • Start a family gift exchange

6. Plan ahead: Set aside specific days for shopping, baking, visiting friends and other activities. Plan your menus and then make your shopping list. That’ll help prevent last-minute scrambling to buy forgotten ingredients. Ask for support for party prep and cleanup.

7. Setting Limits: Saying yes when you want to say no can leave you feeling resentful and overwhelmed. If you can’t participate in a project or activity, try and be clear about which ones you can say no to and take that time for other activities like rest and self -care.

8. Keep healthy habits: 

  • Have a healthy snack before holiday parties so that you don’t go overboard on sweets or drinks.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Incorporate regular physical activity into each day as it helps with both physical and emotional wellbeing.

9. Take a breather: Make some time for yourself. Spending just 15 minutes alone, without distractions, may refresh you enough to handle everything you need to do. Find something that reduces stress by clearing your mind, slows your breathing and restores inner calm.

10. Seek professional help if you need it: Despite your best efforts, you may find yourself feeling persistently sad or anxious, plagued by physical complaints, unable to sleep, irritable and hopeless, and unable to face routine chores. If these feelings last for a while, seek help from a professional.

I hope that this helps make the holidays more enjoyable for you and yours. Happy Holidays!

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Introducing: Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy

By Amy Gildner

What is Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy is a holistic healthcare profession that aims to help those affected by injury, illness or disability.  Physiotherapists specialize in the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of a variety of neurological, orthopedic, and cardiorespiratory conditions.  In Ontario, individuals can see physiotherapists without a doctor’s referral.

Pelvic floor physiotherapy is the assessment and treatment of various conditions including, but not limited to, conditions of the muscles, bones, connective tissues, and ligaments surrounding the pelvis.  This is a specialty within the physiotherapy profession, and is conducted by registered physiotherapists who have also undergone further education.

A typical initial appointment will include a detailed internal and external examination of your pelvis, a discussion of the findings as well as a possible treatment plan specifically tailored to your needs.  This treatment may include additional internal pelvic floor therapy, bladder retraining, stretching, and strengthening techniques.

Why is Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy so important?

As women, our bodies can end up going through a lot. In addition to the maintenance of overall health and strength, pelvic floor health is equally as important, especially pre- & postpartum. Some conditions that can be treated through pelvic floor physiotherapy include:

  • Vaginal pain
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Pain during sex
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Low back pain
  • Sacroiliac pain
  • Piriformis syndrome/sciatica

Contact the clinic to find out more information!

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A Chiropractic Pregnancy!

A Chiropractic Pregnancy!
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By Dr. Elisa Petricca

A healthy mom translates into a healthy baby. So why not do everything you can to have a safe, healthy and natural pregnancy!?

This post focuses on educating pregnant mum’s on how to prepare for the birthing process and the value of chiropractic care during pregnancy. A pregnant woman who trusts her body to do what it is naturally designed to do is much more likely to experience a healthy, natural birth than someone who is stressed and fearful. The brain responds to fearful emotions negatively during pregnancy, releasing hormones that can slow labour and dilation.

How to Prepare for Birth

Scientific research strongly suggests the following principles for a natural and healthy pregnancy and birth:

  • A fully functional nervous system: This is essential to assist the body in adapting to stressors associated with pregnancy and support development to the baby.
  • Proper dietary intake: This is required for optimal fetal development.
  • Movement and exercise: This will encourage optimal brain and cell function, hormonal balance, strength and mobility.
  • Positive thoughts and emotions.
  • A nurturing environment: It is important to be surrounded by loving and supportive relationships to help minimize stress and create an optimal environment fir a relaxed birth.
  • A birth support team: Comprised of loved ones and health professionals to assist in a natural birth.

The Value of Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic care during pregnancy is vital in supporting normal and physiological function of mom and baby. Chiropractic care can help with pregnancy and birth by:

  • Reducing interference to the mother’s nervous system, allowing for optimal function.
  • Helping to create balance in the pelvis, allowing for an easier birth.
  • Removing tension on the ligaments that support the uterus.
  • Decreasing the potential for interventions and increasing the potential for a natural birth.

How does chiropractic care support the developing infant?

  • Encourages optimal infant development by removing interference from the mother’s nervous system.
  • Helps to create more room in the uterus, allowing baby to move and develop without restriction. This allows the baby to move into the best possible position for birth.
  • Regular adjustments greatly reduce the possibility of dystocia (delayed birth) as well as birth trauma that can be caused by intervention.

What are the main things you should take away from this whole article?

  1. Chiropractic provides structural balance and stability (specifically in the pelvis) for the mother, resulting in a more comfortable pregnancy.
  2. Research has shown that pregnant mothers who receive regular chiropractic care throughout their pregnancy generally have a shorter labour with less medical intervention.
  3. Chiropractic care throughout pregnancy can help to create a healthier and more comfortable in-utero environment for the infant.
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